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Make-up

Make-up
by Kiyoshi Kobayakawa (1898-1948)

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Artist: Kiyoshi Kobayakawa (1898-1948) 小早川清
Title: Make-up
Series: Womens manners of today
Date 1st edition?1930/6
Date of this artwork?1930 (may not be accurate)
Publisher 1st edition?Privately published
Publisher (this edition)?Privately published
Medium (1st edition): Woodblock
Medium (this edition): Woodblock
Format (1st edition): Large Oban
Format (this edition): Large Oban
DB artwork code: 38216
Notes (1st edition)?Artist Kiyoshi Kobayakawa 1897-1948


Format: Dai oban tate-e: 21" x 12.5" approx

Description "Kindai Ji Se Shou no Uchi" (Women's Manners of Today) . No.2. A girl is applying make-up after a bath.

Rare.

Publisher: Self-published by the artist

Date: 1930

Width Item 12.2 inches = 31.0 cm
Height Item 20.7 inches = 52.5 cm

Literature Newland, Amy R.; and S. Hamanaka, "The Female Image: 20th Century Prints of Japanese Beauties", Leiden: Hotei, 2000, ISBN 90 74822 20 7, - pg.142, pl.190
Notes (this edition)?The following information was taken from the original web listing of this artwork. Often written by non-experts, there may be inaccuracies:

Saturday, 6 August 2005

Artist Kiyoshi Kobayakawa

Series Women's manners of the day

Title Make-up (40/100)
Date Of Work 1930

Publisher Privately published

Dimensions 21 x 12

Condition Fine impression color and condition

Notes No.2 from Kiyoshi's most sought after series. Privately published in an edition of 100

Artist Bio: Kobayakawa Kiyoshi is best known for designing woodblock prints of modern Japanese women. Born in Hakata, a town in the Fukuoka Province of Kyushu, Kiyoshi was one of many artists who studied with Kaburagi Kiyokata, the famous painter and print designer. Kiyoshi entered Kiyokata's school at age twenty and probably knew Kiyokata's other students including Ito Shinsui, Kawase Hasui, and Torii Kotondo. Unfortunately, little is known about Kiyoshi's life compared to those other print designers. During the 1920's and 1930's, he exhibited Nihonga (Japanese-style) paintings at several exhibitions including the Kyodokai and the Imperial Academy Exhibition. In 1923, he contributed a print design to the series, "Complete Collection of Chikamatsu". This was probably Kiyoshi's first experience designing woodblock prints. Beginning in 1930, Kiyoshi began designing a series of six bijin prints which he called "Modern Fashionable Styles" (Kindai jisei sho). These prints were carved by Tadano Shichinosuke and printed by Ono Tomisaburo. The prints in this series were (1) Tipsy, (2) Powdering the Face, (3) Pedicure, (4) Expression of Eyes, (5) Black Hair, and (6) Rouge. Though most of these prints depict Japanese women engaged in traditional feminine pursuits, Tipsy is remarkable for its frank portrayal of a modern girl, or moga. It depicts a Japanese woman dressed in fashionable Western clothing and jewelry, drinking and smoking a cigarette. Her flirtatious, blurred gaze and her flushed cheeks indicate that she is intoxicated. This print was considered quite risque when it was first published. Kiyoshi designed thirteen prints in all, twelve of which were exhibited at the 1936 Toledo Exhibition. In addition to his six self-published prints, three were published by Hasegawa, three by Ensendo (Takamizawa) and one by Watanabe Shozaburo. Kiyoshi was awarded the special rank of Tokusen for his 1933 print, The Geisha Ichimaru. He died in April 1948 at Ikegami, Tokyo. Some of his woodblocks have been reprinted since his death and have later publisher's seals in the margin. Kobayakawa Kiyoshi is best known for designing woodblock prints of modern Japanese women. Born in Hakata, a town in the Fukuoka Province of Kyushu, Kiyoshi was one of many artists who studied with Kaburagi Kiyokata, the famous painter and print designer. Kiyoshi entered Kiyokata's school at age twenty and probably knew Kiyokata's other students including Ito Shinsui, Kawase Hasui, and Torii Kotondo. Unfortunately, little is known about Kiyoshi's life compared to those other print designers. During the 1920's and 1930's, he exhibited Nihonga (Japanese-style) paintings at several exhibitions including the Kyodokai and the Imperial Academy Exhibition. In 1923, he contributed a print design to the series, "Complete Collection of Chikamatsu". This was probably Kiyoshi's first experience designing woodblock prints. Beginning in 1930, Kiyoshi began designing a series of six bijin prints which he called "Modern Fashionable Styles" (Kindai jisei sho). These prints were carved by Tadano Shichinosuke and printed by Ono Tomisaburo. The prints in this series were (1) Tipsy, (2) Powdering the Face, (3) Pedicure, (4) Expression of Eyes, (5) Black Hair, and (6) Rouge. Though most of these prints depict Japanese women engaged in traditional feminine pursuits, Tipsy is remarkable for its frank portrayal of a modern girl, or moga. It depicts a Japanese woman dressed in fashionable Western clothing and jewelry, drinking and smoking a cigarette. Her flirtatious, blurred gaze and her flushed cheeks indicate that she is intoxicated. This print was considered quite risque when it was first published. Kiyoshi designed thirteen prints in all, twelve of which were exhibited at the 1936 Toledo Exhibition. In addition to his six self-published prints, three were published by Hasegawa, three by Ensendo (Takamizawa) and one by Watanabe Shozaburo. Kiyoshi was awarded the special rank of Tokusen for his 1933 print, The Geisha Ichimaru. He died in April 1948 at Ikegami, Tokyo. Some of his woodblocks have been reprinted since his death and have later publisher's seals in the margin.

The artworks displayed on JAODB are not for sale.

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